Forbes: Powered By 5G, Extended Reality Gets To Work For Business

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Enhancing Employee Skills

In the business environment, using AR can make a huge improvement in training employees in new procedures by walking them through realistic training scenarios. On a continuing basis, they can also help workers perform complex tasks in the field by replacing manuals with pictures of working environments that are augmented with instructions.

Taqtile, a recent graduate of the—a program co-founded by T-Mobile—is one of the companies building AR solutions for desk-less workers that can make this possible. By superimposing visual instructions over relevant equipment, it allows technicians using AR headsets to view virtual service checklists, perform routine maintenance and troubleshoot problems using remote assistance. T-Mobile’s high-capacity 5G network using mid-band spectrum is key to providing the fast responses that enable a realistic feel to the experience. In a recent , John Saw, executive vice president of advanced and emerging technologies at T-Mobile, described how Taqtile’s technology was being used by technicians upgrading T-Mobile’s own network. Similar technology is being employed in the energy industry to inspect turbines and pipework in power stations. People who work in healthcare, agriculture, construction, retail, manufacturing and transportation also do not work behind desks all that much and stand to benefit from developments in AR technology.

And it’s easy to see how an AR approach to training could also be used in these sectors. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted, for example, how the additional pressure on hospitals has elevated the need for healthcare professionals to rapidly learn new skills.